Listen Live
M-F 6AM-8AM

Show Archives

Taxing Situation

September 1, 2017


Kevin O’Neill kicks off the show talking healthcare spending and how much is too much when compensating executives. John Neal of PTI Securities & Futures‘ Peoria, AZ office talks baseball, $GLD and $SLV. Finally, Rick Newman of Yahoo Finance returns to the show. Chief and Rick have a spirited discussion on the tax code and would true tax reform might look like. 

Download MP3

Guests & Co-Hosts

Kevin O’Neill

Kevin O’Neill is our Wednesday morning sports guy. His segment emphasizes what happens off the field as much as what happens on the field. All businesses have their intrigue, but the inner workings of sports organizations find their way into the public domain frequently. Unless a rant from the Chief spills into Kevin’s segment (not an unusual occurrence), he will highlight some of those sports related business issues; but be advised that those highlights usually come with an opinion. Read more.

John Neal

John Neal directs PTI Securities’ Glendale, Arizona office serving the firm’s clients in the Phoenix metro area and across the Western U.S. He oversees day-to-day operations, including client services, investor education, staff management and marketing. John has more than 12 years of management experience in the securities and financial services industry. He joined PTI Securities in 2003 in this role. Prior to that time, he was a branch manager with Phoenix area firms, Granite Capital Management and, most recently, Independent Financial Management. A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, John earned a bachelor’s degree in international management from Arizona State University in Tempe. Away from work, John enjoys reading, live music and outdoor activities. He also volunteers with the St. Vincent De Paul Society and the Lupus Foundation of America. Married with two children, John and his family live in Peoria, Arizona.

Rick Newman

As a columnist for Yahoo! Finance, I explain how the momentous changes sweeping through the economy affect ordinary people–and what you can do about it. My latest book, Liberty For All: A Manifesto for Reclaiming Financial and Political Freedom, is a plea for everyone–have-a-lots, have-a-littles, and have-nots–to develop greater self-reliance and rediscover the genuine meaning of liberty in America. My prior book, Rebounders: How Winners Pivot from Setback to Success, explains how nearly everyone can get better at bouncing back from the adversities that are inevitable in business, avocations, relationships and life. These two books encapsulate my learning so far about the ways we all need to adapt in a Darwinian economy if we want to thrive and prosper.

Before starting at Yahoo! in 2013, I was Chief Business Correspondent for U.S. News & World Report, where I worked as a writer for more than 20 years. I’m also a frequent commenter on networks such as CNN, MSNBC, and Fox, plus a lot of local radio stations, where I try to extract meaning from the torrent of information that flows out of today’s media.

In more than 20 years as a journalist, I’ve ridden on submarines, flown on Air Force jets and tromped through mud with soldiers while covering the Pentagon. I’ve walked the halls on Capitol Hill and interviewed many of America’s top political and business leaders.

On September 11, 2001, shortly after I moved from Washington to New York to cover business, I saw the twin towers burning from a distance–then got summoned to Washington to help cover the Pentagon, which had been my beat just a couple months earlier. That evening, I watched the Pentagon burning from a distance, a perverse twofer. It felt humbling and inspiring to have a role covering the most newsworthy event in the nation in at least a generation.

When I covered the Pentagon, I won the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on National Defense. I’ve also won awards from the National Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists and the International Association of Firefighters. And I’ve been a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists and the National Magazine Award.

I grew up in Pittsburgh, which makes me a stalwart citizen of Steeler Nation. I graduated from Boston College in 1988 with degrees in English and economics, and wrote my senior thesis on Henry James. I recently came across that thesis in a stained cardboard box in my basement; it reminded me that liberal education is an underappreciated privilege. The Jesuits like to say that learning how to learn is the most important thing students can gain from education. These days, learning how to speak Chinese might be a close second, but when it comes to journalism, at least, the Jesuits are right.

My first book, which I co-authored with Don Shepperd, was Bury Us Upside Down: The Misty Pilots and the Secret Battle for the Ho Chi Minh Trail. It’s about a fascinating group of pilots who flew extremely hazardous, top-secret missions over North Vietnam in the late 1960s. Researching and writing that book taught me a lot about America’s most unpopular war, and about America itself. John McCain, who spent more than five years as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam, wrote the foreword. (That was before his 2008 presidential run.) Don was a great partner whom I still count as a valued friend.

After that, I wrote Firefight: Inside the Battle to Save the Pentagon on 9-11, with Patrick Creed, a volunteer firefighter and Army Reserve officer. Although I spent many days in the Pentagon after 9-11, this book was Pat’s idea. We met serendipitously and decided that with his knowledge of firefighting and my experience working in the Pentagon, we’d make a good team. While we were writing the book, Pat’s Army Reserve unit got activated and sent to Iraq for a year, ending up in a dangerous area during one of the bloodiest times of the U.S. operation there. Pat’s unit suffered some serious casualties and Pat himself was injured in a roadside bombing. It made our work on the book harder, but more meaningful. Pat has recovered and we both feel gratified to have provided the most detailed account on record of what happened inside the nation’s military headquarters after American Airlines Flight 77 slammed into the building on 9-11. Writing that book with Pat was a moving and important experience.

I’m not sure what big projects I’ll work on in the future, but humanity provides so much rich material that I feel confident I’ll find fascinating work for as long as I’m lucky enough to practice journalism.

Categories: | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |